Brake horsepower tag

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  • Mark Wakenshaw

    US Member - 1 Year (includes $3 online payment fee)
    Replies: 2
    Topics: 2
    #284862

    I’m in search of one of these tags. Any leads on where to get one.

    Retired OMC and Yamaha Master Tech.. 43 years in the business.


    lyks2tinkr

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 401
    Topics: 55
    #284864

    Good morning.

    What model Elto is it from?

    Not sure if they are being recreated? I’ve seen them on Ebay from time to time.


    Mark Wakenshaw

    US Member - 1 Year (includes $3 online payment fee)
    Replies: 2
    Topics: 2
    #284866

    Good morning.

    What model Elto is it from?

    Not sure if they are being recreated? I’ve seen them on Ebay from time to time.

    it’s for a Mate. I’ve never seen them before and not sure what models they came with. I’ll check eBay. Thanks.

    Retired OMC and Yamaha Master Tech.. 43 years in the business.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 4516
    Topics: 110
    #284874



    The following was posted by Garry Spencer. For those who may not know Garrys
    dad worked for OMC in it’s infancy and got to run many of these early motors when
    they were new. Some passably before they were even available to the public.
    .
    N O A Horse Power Tag.
    In the “Roaring Twenties” (Under water exhausts were rare – 8^D ) it was discovered horse power sold motors. Engineering departments fiddled with the prototypes to get the maximum possible. Unfortunately production motors were not as carefully assembled. This led to most outboards over 4 horse power falling far short of there advertised rating. Sniping by competitors and complaints from customers led to the outboard builders forming the National Outboard Association as a group to rate others motors horse power. Competitors representatives would come into the factory and randomly pick three motors off the assembly line. These were run in and adjusted. They were then put on a dynamometer and the horse power average (to the nearest tenth) of those three became the certified horse power for that model. In a single year (1933) some models lost 20% of there advertised horse power. This rating method continued through the war years of the mid ’40s. It was virtually destroyed by Carl Kiekhaefer who refused to join, and found great commercial success in under rating his Mercury outboards. So ratings became more a product of the advertising department until the Federal Government copied a European trend, and mandated uniform power measurements taken at the propeller shaft.
    .
    In the dawn of outboard use, manufacturing was, of course, rather primitive. Measurements could change by how tight a production worker screwed there micrometer. Precision we take for granted today was totally unknown back then. This was also true in the oil & gasoline industry. Motors had to be designed to work under the worse conditions encountered. The fuel you bought today might be different from that bought last week, even though coming from the same gas station. Ole Evinrude was a great engineer and tireless craftsman. In the beginning (First 50 outboards) he built and tested each motor. To make his products easy to use, he attached a metal tag to the fuel adjustment needle valve indicating the adjustment needed for optimal starting and reliable operation. This continued until production accuracy allowed for the adjustments to be incorporated into the engine.

    3 users thanked author for this post.

    Mark Wakenshaw

    US Member - 1 Year (includes $3 online payment fee)
    Replies: 2
    Topics: 2
    #284904

    Great info. Thanks!

    Retired OMC and Yamaha Master Tech.. 43 years in the business.


    Donald Keller

    US Member - 1 Year (includes $3 online payment fee)
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 9
    #284906



    The following was posted by Garry Spencer. For those who may not know Garrys
    dad worked for OMC in it’s infancy and got to run many of these early motors when
    they were new. Some passably before they were even available to the public.
    .
    N O A Horse Power Tag.
    In the “Roaring Twenties” (Under water exhausts were rare – 8^D ) it was discovered horse power sold motors. Engineering departments fiddled with the prototypes to get the maximum possible. Unfortunately production motors were not as carefully assembled. This led to most outboards over 4 horse power falling far short of there advertised rating. Sniping by competitors and complaints from customers led to the outboard builders forming the National Outboard Association as a group to rate others motors horse power. Competitors representatives would come into the factory and randomly pick three motors off the assembly line. These were run in and adjusted. They were then put on a dynamometer and the horse power average (to the nearest tenth) of those three became the certified horse power for that model. In a single year (1933) some models lost 20% of there advertised horse power. This rating method continued through the war years of the mid ’40s. It was virtually destroyed by Carl Kiekhaefer who refused to join, and found great commercial success in under rating his Mercury outboards. So ratings became more a product of the advertising department until the Federal Government copied a European trend, and mandated uniform power measurements taken at the propeller shaft.
    .
    In the dawn of outboard use, manufacturing was, of course, rather primitive. Measurements could change by how tight a production worker screwed there micrometer. Precision we take for granted today was totally unknown back then. This was also true in the oil & gasoline industry. Motors had to be designed to work under the worse conditions encountered. The fuel you bought today might be different from that bought last week, even though coming from the same gas station. Ole Evinrude was a great engineer and tireless craftsman. In the beginning (First 50 outboards) he built and tested each motor. To make his products easy to use, he attached a metal tag to the fuel adjustment needle valve indicating the adjustment needed for optimal starting and reliable operation. This continued until production accuracy allowed for the adjustments to be incorporated into the engine.

    Great info..thankyou


    The Boat House


    Replies: 4516
    Topics: 110
    #284907



    This is a fuel mixture tag Garry speaks of
    that would be attached to the mixture screw
    of a new motor .
    Some what harder to find than the NOA tag.
    Tubs
    .

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