Caille Neptune Gas Tank Repair?

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  • Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #221745

    I tore the gas tank apart today. I’ve seen worse, but it is fairly
    rusty inside, and has a few pin holes, and likely leaks around
    some of the rivets.
    I’m toying with the idea of buying some sheet metal and starting
    from scratch. It’s been a long time since my 9th grade
    sheet metal class…… that lasted about a week.
    I made a little rectangular box with a cover.
    Only problem is this gas tank looks like a 12th grade project,
    and I don’t have the fancy tools like they did in shop class.

    The middle band of the tank has the folded joints that the top
    and bottom tank pieces fits into. The top and bottom pieces
    just have a 90 degree fold that fits into the band. Getting a
    nice 90 degree fold on the rounded side of the tank might
    be challenging.

    Anybody make their own tanks, and have wisdom to share?

    Whatever fitting for the fuel line, that protruded from the bronze casting
    on the bottom of the tank, has been broken off, and I have
    no petcock for the Caille. Will have to research what I need to
    repair that.
    Thanks!

    DSCN9850

    DSCN9854

    DSCN9859

    DSCN9855

    Prepare to be boarded!

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    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1468
    Topics: 18
    #221751

    I am not into this work BUT how about making a pattern from 1/4 in steel then you may be able to hammer a 90 degree edge around it .just a thought.


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #221752

    That’s a good idea Dave, but I bet even a plywood pattern would work, as the sheet metal
    is only .030 thick. Have to research what gauge that is.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    joecb

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 498
    Topics: 63
    #222103

    Bucc, good start, seeing how the original was put together. I had to make one a while back. Yes, best to have a accurately made hard wood ( maple best) pattern to form the top and bottom accurately and also ensure that the sides fit the top and bottom.

    Joe B

    tank-new-1

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    tank-new-4

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 2 weeks ago by Mumbles.
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    need2fish

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 224
    Topics: 13
    #222518

    Just a thought…. if your priorities are around cosmetics and can stand something unconvential to gain functionality, consider inserting a plastic tank into your newly repaired/homemade tin tank. With that you don’t have to worry about leaky seams. I’ve had some success with bladders .


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #222520

    Bucc, good start, seeing how the original was put together. I had to make one a while back. Yes, best to have a accurately made hard wood ( maple best) pattern to form the top and bottom accurately and also ensure that the sides fit the top and bottom.

    Joe B

    tank-new-1

    tank-new-2

    tank-new-3

    tank-new-4

    • This reply was modified 10 months, 2 weeks ago by Mumbles.

    Joe, Very Nice Job, I’m impressed!
    Few questions if you don’t mind.

    What kind of sheet metal? Plain steel or galvanized?

    Did you use an old fashion blacksmith type soldering iron,
    little bottle torch, or?

    What kind of flux and solder, and did you use muriatic acid for
    cleaning the seams, like I seen on YouTube?

    What if any specialty tools did you use to make the seams?
    I have a small hand brake or flanger… not sure of it’s proper name,
    but it’s about 3″ wide.

    Sorry for all the questions! Thanks.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #222521

    Just a thought…. if your priorities are around cosmetics and can stand something unconvential to gain functionality, consider inserting a plastic tank into your newly repaired/homemade tin tank. With that you don’t have to worry about leaky seams. I’ve had some success with bladders .

    I could think of a couple of issue with a plastic tank inside
    the tank, especially if one used a torch to solder the outer
    tank back up. Also, Not sure what one with do with the gas
    cap to make it look original.
    You may have a sound idea, but I’d probably just
    use gas tank sealer if in doubt about the tank leaking.
    Thanks.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #223851

    Joe, replied to your PM, heading out to the garage, will check back later. Thanks.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #223863

    Just got done removing the brass casting from the bottom tank panel.
    That was harder than taking the tank seems apart, especially when
    you’re worried about breaking the castings. So far, so good.
    I dug out what sheet metal tools I inherited from my dad.
    Forgot I even had the shorter “folder” for bending the edge of sheet metal.
    Found a piece of old sheet metal I may practice on, but not quite
    big enough for the whole tank. Fun.

    DSCN9861

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    bobw

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1522
    Topics: 47
    #223866

    Buc – looks like a real task. Just curious how the castings are attached to the tank – riveted and soldered?

    Bob

    1954 Johnson CD-11
    1956 Johnson RD-18
    1958 Johnson QD-19
    1959 Johnson QD-20
    1957 Evinrude Fastwin 18

    "Every 20 minute job is only a broken bolt away from a 3-day project."


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #223868

    Bob, solder everywhere! The rivets were soldered and peened,
    and thin tin washer inside the tank on the rivets that hold the
    mounting casting.
    Amazing it lasted 100 years in as good
    a shape as it was.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    bobw

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1522
    Topics: 47
    #223869

    Well, the tank may have rusted out but the casting sure weren’t going anywhere!

    Bob

    1954 Johnson CD-11
    1956 Johnson RD-18
    1958 Johnson QD-19
    1959 Johnson QD-20
    1957 Evinrude Fastwin 18

    "Every 20 minute job is only a broken bolt away from a 3-day project."


    joecb

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 498
    Topics: 63
    #223901

    OK, I’m back and will try and answer the questions that Buccaneer asked about how I did my tank.
    – sheet metal? The common material for fuel tanks was Terrne, that is lead coated steel. Hard to find these days, but I was fortunate to find a few pieces 024 thick, that is what I used for the top and bottom panels. Used much thinner stock, 014 bright (tin) steel for the sides as the thinner stock allowed for easier forming of the required tight “S” bend.
    – solder ? I used regular 50/50 lead solder and NoKrode paste flux. If one used galvanized (zinc coated) steel you may need more aggressive acid flux
    – soldering tool? A heavy duty electric soldering copper ( not the little gun type for electrical work)
    – Forming ? Used matching hardwood ( maple) forms for top and bottom panels to form the 3/16 wide flange. To hand form the “S” shape on the side panel , clamped the stock strip between steel bar and carefully mallet formed the “S” in stages.
    – Rivets? soft brass rivets, penned and soldered inside and out.
    Assembly? First join the bottom to the sides, next the brass pieces riveted and soldered to the bottom. Finally close the top.

    Hope this helps,
    Joe B


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5085
    Topics: 831
    #223903

    Joe, much appreciate your posting this information, and enjoyed talking with you!
    I have a lot of good tips to get me started now.
    Thanks!

    Prepare to be boarded!


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3563
    Topics: 88
    #223905

    You're only as smart as the person you're talking to.

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