1924 Johnson Model B

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  • Richard Findlow

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 0
    Topics: 3
    #252097

    Restoring a 1924 Johnson Model B 12309. I have a few quections on accuracy.
    1) The tiller handel & it’s mounting bracket look like they are worn down to copper, but may have had a plating, such as nickle, over the copper as original. Is plating original?
    2) What should the finish be on the driveshaft tube?
    3) I have removed the lower unit,but can’t get the powerhead to come loose from its flange. Removed screws,& tapped lightly with a soft mallet, but won’t budge. Am I missing something, or could there be sealer on the gasket, & I just need to tap harder?
    I appreciate any help on these questions.
    Thanks


    davidk

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 435
    Topics: 182
    #252130

    Can we see some pictures?


    pm-t2

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 498
    Topics: 34
    #252140

    Tiller handle and its grab bar are probably brass and should be nickel plated. There is supposed to be a leather-wrapped wooded grip on the tiller handle.

    Driveshaft tube should be nickel plated as well, but I have to check that. The model B was the first salt-water model Johnson and I believe the main difference between the A and the B was the type of drive and propeller shafts used. The model “A” Johnson definitely had a nickel-plated driveshaft tube. Early models used a steel tube that was nickeled, but they switched to all brass tubes at some point in 1923.

    If the four screws directly underneath the powerhead have been taken out, and your lower unit has also been taken off, then the only thing bonding the base of the crankcase to that flange is friction or corrosion or strong sealer, of a combination of the three. I’d suggest some gentle heating from a propane torch to warm things up, then find a place to nudge it with a plastic hammer or dead-blow mallet with a non-marring face and try to break it loose. Make sure your water pipes are all undone as well.

    Hope this helps.

    Best,
    PM t2

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    The Boat House


    Replies: 3795
    Topics: 95
    #252161



    This fits inside the drive shaft tube. It may be stuck from corrosion.
    Try gripping the flange, not the tube, in some way and with some
    twisting it should break free.
    Tubs

    1 user thanked author for this post.

    Max Jordan

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 8
    Topics: 1
    #252796

    Greetings,
    I have a 1924 Johnson model A25 which apparently in the fresh water version of your B25. My father owned this and I recall it running in the late 50’s when I was a boy. I have inherited it and I want to get it running and restore it to it original condition.

    I need to become educated in these machines and get it running first. My goal is to make it a functional as brand new and as beautiful as the Velo Museum’s 1925 model on display in Velo, Ill. I have attached a photo of their A25. Mine is a long way from this.

    I would appreciate any advice and guidance.

    I live outside of Boston and I have a home on Lake Winnipesaukee NH where I want to drive a cedar strip row boat with my 1924 Johnson in the antique boat parade every summer. Its no Kris craft but….either am I.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3795
    Topics: 95
    #252801



    If your serial number is somewhere between 7501 and 20,000
    your motor is a 1924. If your flywheel says A-25 your motor
    is a 1925 or 26. Serial number over 20,001.
    Take off the prop and remove the cover on the gear case.
    If your lucky you will find a brown lubricant without any
    water and the gears in good condition. You want to clean out
    the gear case as best you can. You will fill it with either John
    Deere Corn Head Grease or Lubriplate 105 Assembly Grease
    but waited till your ready to run the motor. You want to
    remove the water pump and check the condition of the
    pump piston. Also remove the 2 hex caps. These are check
    valves. Inspect their condition. They need to be clean and
    free to operate properly.
    There are 3 screws holding on the rope sheave. These screws
    have a thread that isn’t available today. Be careful with them
    and don’t loose them. You will need to make a “Knocker to
    remove the flywheel. Watch the video on how to use it.
    If you don’t weld you can just jam 2 nuts together. These
    usually only need the points cleaned to have the spark return.
    Inspect the fuel system. Clean carb., gas tank, as necessary.
    Be sure the fuel line is clear and the vent hole in the gas cap
    isn’t plugged. If you have any questions, ask. Someone here
    should be able to help you.
    Tubs



    Max Jordan

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 8
    Topics: 1
    #252866

    Wow great information. I expect that I will need to replace the sparkplug wires. They look rough. Where do I buy parts?

    I agree that it is probably a 1925. I need to go down in the snow to the shed and check the serial number. When I checked the serial numbers last summer I came up with 1925 so the serial number was in the 20,000 range.

    Thanks again. Once I get it running I will take it apart and polish it up and paint as appropriate. Where do I get advice on restoration?

    Max


    pm-t2

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 498
    Topics: 34
    #252884

    This is the best place for the information you need to be successful in restoring, repairing, reviving, or whatever you’re going to do to your motor.

    Keep coming back here. Better yet, think about joining the AOMCI and becoming a full-fledged member. There are plenty of friendly and helpful AOMCI members on your side of the country that would welcome you to the club and also be a great resource for you going forward.

    Hope this helps.

    Best,
    PM T2


    lyks2tinkr

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 366
    Topics: 50
    #252890

    To confirm the serial number look on the lower crankcase flange. The serial number should be stamped there and should match the number on the rope plate.
    It’s not uncommon to find motors with the rope plate replaced.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by lyks2tinkr.

    The Boat House


    Replies: 3795
    Topics: 95
    #252911



    Parts- Decals, spark plugs and spark plug wire, condensers,
    are about all that is available as far as new parts. Someone
    has reproduced the leather covered, wooden grip at one
    time but recent contact (second hand to me) with that
    individual reviled that there isn’t any available as this time.
    If you can, make what you have unusable. Parts come from
    other motors. There is a free classified ad section on this
    website. Checking eBay, craigslist, and other internet sights
    may produce a part or parts motor. There are also individual
    who sell used parts.
    Nothing was painted. Everything brass should be nickel
    plated. Nuts, screws, bolts, prop nut, water pump, ect.,as well
    as the copper fuel and water tubing.
    Changing the spark plug wires.
    First challenge is the remove the wire nuts.
    They are easily broken and difficult to replace.
    Second, you’ll find that where the wires connect to the coil is
    sealed with Tar. A heat gun will soften the tar enough so that
    you can remove the coil. Originally the connection is made
    with springs inside glass tubes. Most people don’t notice those
    parts were even in there as they get lost in the tar when removing
    it. Kerosene works as well as anything to clean up the parts.
    Picture shows how I connect the new wires. I don’t think too
    many people replace the tar once its removed.
    Tubs


    kirkp

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 238
    Topics: 16
    #252981

    Hey Richard. Looks like a great project that I can’t help you with but you already have a lot of great help. I see you’re new to the organization and the forum and it’s great to see new members coming in.

    Welcome!

    Kirk


    Max Jordan

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 8
    Topics: 1
    #252987

    Oh man this is going to be fun. Thank you so much for the advice. I am surprised that there was no paint. The restored one at the Velo Museum has paint. It will be much better if I don’t have to paint. Do you have any photos of restroed Johnson Outboards of that vintage? The cosmetics are what interest me .

     

    Max


    stanley

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 496
    Topics: 107
    #252988

    This is an unrestored 1926 model but basically same as yours.Cylinders were originally nickel plated so you could use “silvery” color paint on yours if you want.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by stanley.

    Max Jordan

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 8
    Topics: 1
    #252992

    what a great looking motor. Early in this post I placed a photo of the 1925 Johnson at the Velo museum in Velo Ill. It has some nice trim paint on it. What do you think of this?

    I intend to use the motor in the annual boat parade in NH at Lake Winnipesauke in July. I will put it on a vintage row boat – if I can find one- and motor along with the fancy Chris Crafts. Its a big deal

    Thanks for sharing

    Max

     

     


    stanley

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 496
    Topics: 107
    #252993

    If you are asking about the red paint on the rope plate and flywheel,I am not a fan.

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