1933 Johnson J-65 restoration questions

Home Forum Ask A Member 1933 Johnson J-65 restoration questions

Tagged: ,

Currently, there are 0 users and 1 guest visiting this topic.
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

  • redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262132

    I just picked up a 1933 Johnson J-65. It turns over and all the parts seem to be present. It even has what may be the original pull rope and handle.

    After ascertaining that it turns over nicely, I tested the compression. Cold, of course, it was around 70-75 pounds. I assume that’s pretty good for an 89 year old engine.

    Next I checked to see if it had spark. None. The plug wire was quite bent and torn and thus suspect where it came out of the stator plate. I got the fly-wheel off and all the parts seemed to be present. After removing the coil I could see that the plug wire was not making sufficient contact with it. It basically checks out with primary showing no ohms to ground and the secondary showing the proper resistance to ground. That was good news. Who knows where I’d find another. I buffed up the secondary button on the coil. A major question I have: Is it a good idea to solder the plug wire to that secondary button. I understand the original had some springs or other devices to hold the plug wire on the secondary “button” but could find none. I saw some, but not too much amounts of the “tar” I’ve read about elsewhere.

    I’ve ordered a length of copper core 7mm plug wire I’ll use to replace the original, which was cracked and shortened because of the break I mentioned above where it came out of the stator plate. The motor had what looked like an original Champion 7 plug which cleaned up nicely. I assume the plug ought to be gapped to .30 .

    The condenser appears to be an original with the wire to the points attached by a little nut holding the wire coming from the points to the threaded portion coming out of the end of the condenser. I checked the condenser’s uf reading and it came in at a lowly .136 uf. Is that within specs or hopelessly low?

    Any suggestions or other cautions would be appreciated.

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by redpackman. Reason: grammar

    The Boat House


    Replies: 3905
    Topics: 99
    #262135



    Been so long since I was in here I don’t remember
    what was original but mine is soldered on now.
    Condenser value is .12 uf.on the listing I have.
    Tubs
    .


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262160

    Thank you, Boat House.

    That information and that photo are so very helpful. Thank you again!  Sounds like I have a good possibility of a runner!

    I have a couple of old Champion outboards, one from 1941 and the 4K from 1948 that we inherited from my wife’s grandfather. I’ve got both of them running, but this is the first time I’ve worked on a Johnson.  Your advice and insight are MUCH appreciated.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3905
    Topics: 99
    #262188



    The odds are it will run. Most of these old motors
    never got used enough to be worn out but often
    weren’t stored well. Gas left in them, water in the
    gear case. Knocked over a few times denting the
    gas tank. And worst of all a damp, humid
    environment. I haven’t run mine in several years
    but the last time I did I ran it several times a day
    for a few weeks. Never let me down. I decided to
    sell it as I wasn’t using it. Got it all cleaned up and
    shinny an fell in love all over again.
    You know about 105 or Corn Head grease for the
    Gear case?
    Tubs
    .


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262219

    One final question:  what do I need to do to check the cooling system on this?  how does it work? I know how it works with the champions. they have a metal impeller and it seems to work well but I don’t know about this particular model of Johnson. I don’t want to be able to get it started and then burn it up because the cooling system isn’t working.


    Tom

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 558
    Topics: 49
    #262222

    There is a plunger pump mounted on the lower unit.  It’s the casting the water tube goes into.  Remove the hex plugs one at a time and make sure the valves are free to move.  Grease up the lower unit.  Remove the water tube between the pump and the leg and blow through the fitting on the leg.  You should feel air coming out of the water outlet fitting halfway up the leg.  If not, you’ll need to find out where the blockage is.  Make sure the water inlet on the pump is not plugged up.  Replace the water tube and give it a shot.  You should see water coming out of the outlet fitting.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3905
    Topics: 99
    #262224



    Tom beat me to it but I spent so time on this so
    this is what I can offer.
    The cooling system is a pump.
    A piston operates from an eccentric on the prop
    shaft gear. You’ll find some wear on the bottom
    of the piston but unless its extensive you should
    be ready to go.
    You’ll probably find some pitting on the eccentric.
    Someone once told me the pits carry grease
    providing lubrication. As most don’t have the
    equipment to repair this we just run them as is.
    It works for me. If the pitting is really severe
    check the bottom of the piston from time to time.
    You don’t want to wear a hole in it. You can solder
    on a piece of copper or brass as a repair.
    Most of us can handle that.
    There are 2 check valves that should be looked at
    to be sure they are not stuck or dirty. You can just
    stick the pump in some water and work the piston
    to see if it pumps. If you need to remove the caps
    I suggest you clamp them in a vice and twist the
    pump to remove them. They are often very tight
    and the soft brass is torn up easily.
    Tubs
    .


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262539

    Ok, some success to report. I got it started this morning and it ran. Had it hanging down from its stand into a garbage can full fo water (no prop, obviously). The carb needle adjustment is REALLY fine. A 1/8 turn either way will start to kill the engine. But the sweet spot ran strong. But there wasn’t much water coming out of the hole on the side of the shaft so I shut it down. It was getting more than warm.

    I’ve now taken apart the pump. The plunger seems to be in very good condition, no hole and not any bad scoring. I”m lucky. It moves freely. I’ve taken out the plugs to inspect the two valves. Do they operate simply by gravity to close? I’ve blown air into the lower line attached to the pump (now disconnected, of course) and it seems that the line is open and I can hear/feel air coming out of the discharge port on the end of the line that’s on the power shaft.  Is there supposed to be a screen over the open part of the pump that has one of the check valves in it? Mine has one that has been soldered in. I’ve cleaned that well since whoever soldered it was a little to aggressive with the solder and covered up probably 20% of the screen holes. Maybe that was my problem.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.

    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5905
    Topics: 906
    #262544

    In looking at Tubs photo, I’d say “yes” to gravity on the check valves.
    If the check valve faces and their seats look okay, and the piston is good,
    it should pump ample water. I would redo the intake screen for sure though.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262555

    IMG_6043-2

    I’ll try posting again. I was able to start the J-65 today. I noticed that the needle valve adjustment was very sensitive. A slight turn either way would cause the engine to lose power, but the sweet spot seemed to work well. I’m not sure about the water cooling pump, however. A little water was coming out of the outlet on the shaft, but not much and it was clear that the engine was heating up, so I shut it down.  I had been running it on it’s stand with the power shaft in a garbage can of water (no prop, obviously).

    This afternoon, I removed the water pump and examined it. The piston is in very good condition it appears. No holes and the spring action seems good. I know from turning the engine over manually that it does move up and down smoothly. I removed the plugs and examined the check valves. They seemed to be clean as did the pump assembly in general.

    I did notice that the screen on what I assume is the pump’s water intake was a little dirty and whoever had it soldered it in place and seemed to overdo it a bit, perhaps obstructing 20% of the screen. Perhaps it’ll do better now.

    Do these engines water channels often plug up in the lines and in the power head? I tried blowing some compressed air through the lines and I think it was moving through, but the results were not conclusive.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.

    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262572

    This is the third time I’ve tired to post today and they won’t stick. Perhaps it’s because I tried to post photos…very confusing.

    I got the Johnson started today. I found the fine tuning jet on the carb to be very sensitive. a 1/16 turn either way and it’d start to kill. But in the sweet spot it ran strong. I had it on a stand with the power shaft down in a garbage can full of water, no prop, obviously.  Shortly, I noticed a minimal amount of water dribbling out of the orifice on the shaft. The engine was heating up so I shut it off.

    I pulled the pump and took it apart. Seemed pretty clean. The pump cylinder and spring worked well and weren’t binding. The cylinder was in good shape with no holes or problems. The check valves were clean and seemed to be free motion. The only thing I saw was that someone soldered in the screen at the bottom of the intake on the pump and got a little too aggressive with the solder, probably plugging up 25% of the area.  I tried blowing and shooting air through the water channels and it seemed to go, but I wasn’t sure. Key question: Do they or the water channels in the head plug up often? None of the tubes were kinked, but at least this morning there wasn’t enough cooling.

     

    I’ll try to post some pictures in a subsequent posting, but in the last three tries that has been the kiss of death for the whole thing.


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262574

    IMG_6034
    IMG_6036IMG_6042-4
    IMG_6043-4


    redpackman


    Replies: 11
    Topics: 4
    #262578

    Success! Today I checked out the water line and found no clear blockages as best I could. I also was able to removed some of the solder over the screen in the water intake port in the pump.

    Set up the motor again in the garbage can with the water in it. Pulled the rope once and it fired off, adjusted the carb and the fuel mixture jet…….and the water was shooting out of the discharge port just as it should. It was able to keep the cylinder cool enough so I could touch it. It was warm, but not as hot as before.

    All seems to be working well.

    Thank you to those who offered the good advice I relied on heavily to get this 89 year old going again. I’ve worked on a couple of Champions from the 40’s but this was a different bird.  I’ll sleep well tonight.

    Success!!

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by redpackman.

    The Boat House


    Replies: 3905
    Topics: 99
    #262588



    The piston shows normal wear which should
    Indicate the rest of the system is in good
    condition. While this pump is adequate it is far
    from robust. The blockage from the solder needs
    to be addressed.
    The mixture screw response you describe is normal.
    Blockage in the water passages does occur but
    I’ve never experienced that in any of the early
    Johnson I have had. Blowing air through the
    cylinder normally brings out some rust partials
    but as you have already run water through
    yours anything loose has likely been flushed
    out. In any case don’t attempt to remove the
    fittings from the cylinder as the tend to break
    off.
    Tubs
    .

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.