1960 Evinrude 5.5 Fisherman Powerhead

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  • William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269667

    Hello all.

    I just tore down the powerhead on a 1960 Fisherman as it had no compression in the bottom cylinder. I was surprised to see that the cylinder walls were clean with no scoring and that the pistons were the same. I suspect that this motor had overheated at one time which weakened the rings as when I pulled the lower unit there was an aftermarket waterpump that had a tiny impeller in it as well as the water pasages in the powerhead being caked.  I am going to hone the cylinder walls and install new rings. I see that they come in standard and oversized by .020. I am guessing that the oversized ring is available for if the cylinder was bored. Since I am going to hone it I am guessing that the standard rings are the ones to use. Also looking for a source for the rings as the the part # provided in the parts listing are for a set of 3 #486275 for the standard rings and #486294 for the oversized rings. Both are unavailable.  Looking for clarification and for source for the rings. Thanks in advance.

    Bill


    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 6414
    Topics: 50
    #269668

    Cylinders must be bored if you are going to use oversize rings.  According to what you said, it doesn’t need boring/oversize.  There is something you aren’t telling us.  NO compression???  Even worn-out rings will produce some compression.

     

    Edit:  Replacement water pump kits have small impellers.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by frankr.

    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269670

    When I say no compression… Top cylinder was 65 and bottom was 15


    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1939
    Topics: 29
    #269671

    check for bad head gasket first.


    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269672

    That was my first suspicion. I did check it and it was not in the best of condition. Replacing improved some compression in the top cylinder but bottom was still low.


    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 6414
    Topics: 50
    #269673

    Well 15 psi certainly is low or “none”.  65 is borderline.  Were the rings stuck or something?


    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269674

    The rings were stuck. Seafoam and PB Blaster did free them up but compression was not there.


    aquasonic

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 560
    Topics: 39
    #269675

    If the motor has overheated, you should see signs of overheating such as discolored paint on the cylinder head, and relatively loose cylinder head bolts. A bad overheat will produce scored pistons and brittle heat weakened rings. It doesn’t sound like this motor experienced a bad overheat. If the motor hasn’t overheated badly, then the rings may be salvageable.

    At this point, it may be prudent to take a very close look at the cylinder head. Inspect the head for any tiny cracks, or imperfections. If it passes inspection, resurface the mating surface by lapping it on a plate of glass, or a large, polished floor tile. While you’re at it, inspect the mating surface of the block also. The block can also be lapped if it has gouges or is not flat.

    I believe the standard rings for that motor were used for many years going back to the 1940’s, and into the 1960’s. There are older part numbers that may help with your search. Try PN 378432 or 041333.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by aquasonic.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by aquasonic.

    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269678

    Funny you say this. Some of the head bolts were loose where others were locked on solid. I cannot say there was considerable discoloration but again I do know that the water channels were not able to flow freely due to caked on crud. I did clean up the cylinder head on a piece of glass and got it to be clean all over uniformly. There is an ever so slight wobble to it that is not excessive that could indicate that the head is out of tolerance. The gasket should make up for it and I believe it to be good at this time. There are no cracks in the head or other imperfections that I could identify. The block also looks to be ok. I cannot understand why the part # has not been cross referenced to another set of rings. As you stated they made millions of these motors using the same pistons for decades. I guess it’s part of the fun searching what you need. Thanks for the input and for the part numbers. The 378432 part # is non-existant. I will try the other.  Thanks.


    aquasonic

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 560
    Topics: 39
    #269680

    “There is an ever so slight wobble to it that is not excessive that could indicate that the head is out of tolerance.”

    This may be the problem, or part of the problem. After lapping, the cylinder head should sit perfectly flat on a large, polished tile or plate of glass.


    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269688

    I came across rings but they are from Greece. They are said to fit this motor and not unreasonably priced. Has anyone done business with DLA Engine Parts and if so how was your experience. Total for 6 rings is $55.00. Given that this may be my only option I may have to go with it.

    DLA Engine Parts+30 210 220 3164

    Piston Ring for EVINRUDE, JOHNSON, HIAWATHA Outboard Motors 5, 5.5, 6HP (1.937") - Picture 1 of 1

    This listing is about a brand new after-market top-quality Piston Ring made by the well-known OEM firm CABER (Italy), which fits the following engine models with bore size 1-15/16″, and replaces OEM Part #0378432. Note: The pistons for the following engines take 3 rings. Also, some of the below engines have two cylinders.

    • ATLAS ROYAL Outboard Motors:
      • 1947-55 (5 HP)
    • BROOKLURE (Spiegel’s Outboard Motors):
      • 1950-58 (5 HP)
    • BUCCANEER Outboard Motors:
      • 1950-63 (5 HP)
    • EVINRUDE Outboard Motors:
      • 1965-68 (5 HP)
      • 1956-65 (5.5 HP)
      • 1965-72 (6 HP)
    • JOHNSON Outboard Motors:
      • 1954-67 (5.5 HP)
      • 1965-72 (6 HP)
    • HIAWATHA Outboard Motors:
      • 1951-55 (5 HP):
        • 25-7970
        • 25-7971
        • 150M125-7973A
        • 250M125-7963A
        • 350M125-79723
        • 350M125-7972B
        • 450M125-7973A
        • 840M125-7972A
        • 940M125-7972A
      • 1951 50DL, 50S
      • 1947 (3 HP): 25-3260, 25-7969
    • SEA BEE Outboard Motors:
      • 1946-59 (5 HP)
    • SEA FLYER Outboard Motors
      • 1951-52 (5 HP): 45-060, 64-180
    • SEA KING Outboard Motors
      • 1945-63 (5 HP)
    • WESTERN FLYER Outboard Motors:
      • 1941-42 (2.5 HP) 121W, 122W
      • 1941-42 (5 HP) 251W, 252W

    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4397
    Topics: 45
    #269693

    Did it look  like the powerhead had been apart before?  Perhaps someone has been inside, attempted to bore, or perhaps over honed that cylinder in an effort to get rid of scuffs and scores.  It is usually pretty easy to tell if someone has had the powerhead apart, paint off the crankcase screws, unpainted sealer oozing out between crankcase halves.   I would carefully measure the cylinder bores, piston skirts, and check ring end gaps using the old rings.

    You mention that the pistons were not scuffed, and the cylinder walls were clean with no aluminum transfer of scoring.   You said that you surfaced the head, but it has a slight wobble, that is no good.  You must make sure that the cylinder head is perfectly flat.  Perhaps the block is not true/flat as well, but it is much harder to try to true up that surface because you have the steel cylinder sleeve to deal with.  Excessive sanding on the block will just grind away the aluminum leaving the steel sleeves relatively untouched.

    I suppose it is possible that the aluminum in the head is cracked or damaged somehow allowing the compression to leak out, but not real likely.  What did the head gasket look like, you can usually see burn thru marks if it has failed.  Did it look like the head gasket had been replaced before??

    I know I have mentioned alot of things, but you really need to find the cause of compression loss before just putting the engine back together.  I just don’t want you to spend alot of money on rings/gaskets, and then still have low compression after reassembly.

    I guess I should have led with questioning the compression gage.  That lower plug hole is buried down inside the pan on those engines, making it a little more difficult to thread the compression gage in there properly.  Are the plug threads OK in the cylinder head?  Perhaps the gage wasn’t threading completely/properly into the plug hole.

     


    William MacNeill

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 46
    Topics: 15
    #269694

    There is no indication of the powerhead ever being split. The head gasket was part of the cause of the compression loss. It was in rough shape and was blown through in spots. Compression improved when replaced on the top cylinder but the bottom was still low. The walls of the cylinders look smooth and with no imperfections and the pistons being the same. The lower rings were stuck prior to me splitting the case open with carbon build up on the lower cylinder. I did get them free with PB Blaster and Seafoam. I still believe this engine overheated. As I stated the waterpump was aftermarket and much smaller than the OEM. I’m sure it worked when new but the impeller was in need of replacement when I checked it. The thermostat was broken and with no rubber ring on top. The water passages were also caked restricting water flow so I’m sure no water was circulating whenever it was last run. Not that this makes a difference there was a cotter pin in place of the drive shaft pin and there was only one brass nut on the shift rod. The carb was gummed up completely. This motor was not taken care of. I bought this motor for 50.00 as it’s appearance was clean and not knowing the  mechanical condition I thought I could get it running by rebuilding the carb and water pump. I should of done a compression test before buying it but again went by appearance. I do not have a lot into this motor. I could part it out but I decided I am going to get it to run as appearance wise it’s a strong 7 out of 10 and it came with a nice gas tank.  I am going to hone both cylinder walls and throw rings into it and hope for the best. If that does not do it then I will put it aside until a better powerhead with compression can be found. I now know why it was $50.00. I am hoping to find the rings locally or here in the US instead of going overseas to purchase.


    labrador-guy

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 817
    Topics: 59
    #269696

    Now that you have it apart did you check the end gap of the rings?   Take the rings off the pistons then slide the rings back in the boar, push them down about half way of there travel.   Use the piston to make sure the rings are square with the bore.  If they are worn you will have a big gap.  Somebody on our site here will know the proper spacing.   These motors rarely need rings but if that space is wide you will have an idea about wear.

    dale


    bobw

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2116
    Topics: 52
    #269697

    My Evinrude service data says ring end gap for a 1960 Fisherman would be 0.005 to 0.015.

    Bob

    1937 Champion D2C Deluxe Lite Twin
    1954 Johnson CD-11
    1957 Evinrude Fastwin 18
    1958 Johnson QD-19
    1958 Johnson FD-12
    1959 Johnson QD-20

    “Every 20 minute job is only a broken bolt away from a 3-day project.”

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