carb adjustment two Elgin 1.25

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #232969

    I’ve been out a few time with these two Elgin 1.25hp. At 19 pounds they fit a canoe. Problem…I spend half my time with one hand on the main fuel adjustment valve. The engines seem very sensitive to fuel adjustment, they definitely don’t tolerate rich settings and every few minutes I hear the motor slow and have to adjust the mixture. Sometimes merely putting pressure on the valve stem fixes the problem. Never does it take more than a very slight movement. I visualize inside the valve the conical shape is gone and just a flat surface remains. Is there a replacement or do I try to reshape the tip of the valve?

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #232970

    Homemade transome mount fifteen ft Chestnut canoe

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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1451
    Topics: 44
    #232972

    I have two 1 1/4 Elgins. They are both very sensitive to adjustment but not quite as bad as you describe. They are also very sensitive to dirt and crud of any size, in the carb, line and tank. Being as they are as much as 75 years old, there’s been ample time for crud build-up and mis-use. I would start by cleaning the carb, line and tank, even if you already did it once. Fuel itself is a cleaner and can loosen and dislodge dirt and garbage that you may not have gotten out the first time. Crank case seal and flange leaks, if you have them, don’t help. All that being said, that’s why they give us adjustments…so we can tweak it when needed.

    Long live American manufacturing!

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Avatarbillw.
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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1451
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    #232974

    Nice canoe. In the picture, what is the thing that appears to loop over the wide-open throttle handle? Is that a fuel line? If so, that loop may be a big part of the problem. Sorry if I am not seeing it the right way.

    Long live American manufacturing!

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5620
    Topics: 49
    #232981

    I’ve been out a few time with these two Elgin 1.25hp. At 19 pounds they fit a canoe. Problem…I spend half my time with one hand on the main fuel adjustment valve. The engines seem very sensitive to fuel adjustment, they definitely don’t tolerate rich settings and every few minutes I hear the motor slow and have to adjust the mixture. Sometimes merely putting pressure on the valve stem fixes the problem. Never does it take more than a very slight movement. I visualize inside the valve the conical shape is gone and just a flat surface remains. Is there a replacement or do I try to reshape the tip of the valve?

    Well there ya go—-the pointy tip is gone from the needle. Try to reshape it if you can. Otherwise, you need a replacement.

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #232992

    billw, good eye. I wondered if someone would see that. Not the fuel line, a piece of copper wire. I forgot to tighten the spark adjustment plate screw when I put everything back together. Copper wire keeps the throttle in place.

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #232994

    frankr…thanks. I was afraid of damaging something but I’ll give it a go. Nothing to loose I guess.

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #232996

    I don’t think fuel contamination is the problem. The one fuel line I modified. The other is original. Cleaned both tanks and carbs.

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #233029

    Billw, I took out the valve stems and one from a parts Elgin 1.25. the parts motor has a different valve. Much sharper. Do you happen to know what’s in your motors?

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    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1354
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    #233032

    the adjustment is not to loose and moving is it. snug it up a little.

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #233041

    Thanks dave, It is snug, set it to where i can move it but it’s stiff. don’t want to leak fuel. I’m now puzzled. Two different valves. I’ll get out next time the sun shines and take tools. I’ll switch valves on the lake.

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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1451
    Topics: 44
    #233049

    Billw, I took out the valve stems and one from a parts Elgin 1.25. the parts motor has a different valve. Much sharper. Do you happen to know what’s in your motors?

    That’s interesting. Now I’m going to have to go take them out and find out!!

    Long live American manufacturing!

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 5620
    Topics: 49
    #233060

    cancel

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #233115

    I was just out on the water with this motor. My take on this is a follows. The sharper valve solves my problem of oversensitivity. Note that valve has no knob, just a small cross pin. I guess the original users finding they could turn the valve all the way in or all the way out managed to either damage the valve or get the adjustment wrong. When they took it back to Sears the company was notified of the problem. As those who know the motor know, I did not mount the carb face plate since it prevents turning the valve more that 180 degrees. On a rebuilt motor and carb you’ll need more motion than that. However, to make the carb fool proof I think the factory came up with the indexed knob which has a lug on the bottom which prevents over 180 degrees motion WHEN the faceplate is mounted. For a new motor the factory simply ran the motor and set the knob. Because there was only 180 degrees movement possible they had to alter the needle vale tip for greater sensitivity. The sharper valve needs near a quarter turn to do what just a sixteenth inch , maybe 5 degrees, will do on the blunted valve. If the motor is new and running new, this works fine. On a worn motor it doesn’t work. I’m quite certain someone removed the faceplate in the past and twisted the valve all the way in , and tight… maybe to prevent leakage when the motor sits in the car. However, I still feel the seat is damaged. With the sharp needle this doesn’t matter. How’s my logic?

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    Timothy McDonald

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 39
    Topics: 6
    #233117

    You can see the stop opposite side of pointer

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