How to test and outboard motor on land

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  • Anonymous

    Replies: 251
    Topics: 33
    #5540


    I did this at TechShop Menlo Park’s automotive area!

    Step 1: You can test an outboard motor without access to a boat or ocean. Simply mount it to a sturdy platform, place a big bucket underneath it and fill it with water so the propeller is fully submerged.

    Step 2: Clean out the gas can of old gas and oil mixture because it may be water contaminated. Add fresh gas and proper amount of two -stroke oil into the can. Different brands of oils require different amounts so read the directions carefully. Best oil on the market is Red Line brand and the ratio is 8ozs per gallon of gas.

    Step 3: If the motor hasn’t been started in a long time starting fluid will help it start. Unhook the rubber shields over the spark plugs and unscrew the spark plugs all the way out. Starting fluid/ Either is sprayed into the spark plug cavity as well as into the air filter.

    Step 4: If your motor doesn’t start by pilling the cord it may need to be jumped similarly to jumping a car. Use a battery of at least 12 V on one end and hook up jumper cables onto the metal screw heads near the starter of the motor.

    Step 5: Pray to Sea Gods and all nautical creatures that your motor will start and run well!


    bill-mcnamara

    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 240
    Topics: 57
    #46246

    Better to use fuel mix sprayed into cylinders or carb. rather than the ether.
    Mix 24:1 regardless of oil type used.
    Measure compression in each cylinder if possible, looking for close psi.
    Check spark for each cylinder with grounded "air gap" tester.
    .


    cajuncook1


    Replies: 841
    Topics: 72
    #46252
    quote lisa:


    I did this at TechShop Menlo Park’s automotive area!

    Step 1: You can test an outboard motor without access to a boat or ocean. Simply mount it to a sturdy platform, place a big bucket underneath it and fill it with water so the propeller is fully submerged.

    Welcome to the forum! Alot of experience and talent to be found here.

    You must fill the container until it submerges the impeller/water pump housing not just the propeller.

    If you learn do proper inspection of compression, spark/ignition, fuel delivery and maintence then there is no need to call upon the sea gods. 😀

    Was your post meant to to ask questions or be instructional?


    HuQiang


    Replies: 1
    Topics: 0
    #177693

    Would it be dangerous to do so, it should also hurt the propeller?
    You can go here: https://www.allicdata.com/list.html?category_id=1434 Refer to it, hope you can help


    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4367
    Topics: 43
    #177697

    Yes, like Cajuncook says, was your post meant to be instructional or are you asking for advice?
    Many an impeller are ruined trying to barrel test outboards, oftentimes the gearcase is not deep enough in the water for the impeller to prime, letting it run dry and get melted. It is critical that the water level is above the gearcase/exhaust housing joint to avoid problems.
    Barrel testing a large engine like this doesn’t confirm much, except that the engine runs (at low speeds) and pumps water….Don’t attempt to make any final adjustments in a barrel, save that procedure for when the engine is on the boat running in the water. Your stand looks pretty sturdy, but I fear that most folks watching your video/demo would settle for something much weaker/less sturdy, which usually ends up damaging the engine/owner when it falls over….That is a big/heavy engine….


    amuller

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1045
    Topics: 163
    #177722

    There are several points in your initial post that I might disagree with. But an additional point is that you can’t do much more than idle a motor in a barrel, because the water will be whipped up into a froth of liquid and air that will not load the propeller properly or pump well, and the motor will be breathing exhaust rather than clean air. Of course, if you have a dock, or swimming pool, or circular tank that lets the bubbles rise and dissipate, it’s a different story and you can do more.

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