Magna-pull starter

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  • billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #268467

    I’m working on the starter of a Mercury Mark 15, which is much like a Mark 20. Like so many things Mercury did and continues to do, they looked around the market place to see how everybody else built a recoil stater and then did the opposite. These starters use magnets dragging on a steel plate, for the friction needed to move the pawls in and out, as the starter engages or disengages. In order to keep the pawls from vibrating in and rattling against the ratchet/flywheel nut, they came up with the device pictured. It works by friction, moving to block the pawls when the recoil returns an move out of the way when the recoil is pulled, allowing the pawls to move in. On this particular recoil, the friction between this lock-out device pictured is off somehow, so that it stays put with relation to the pulley and doesn’t function as it should. Has anybody run into this before? The small, round retainer is not threaded….it just spins when tuned with pliers….and is captured by a peened-over shaft. There seems to be no way to take it apart without destroying it. Any thoughts are welcome.

    Long live American manufacturing!

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    crosbyman

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2929
    Topics: 281
    #268470

    a few days soakingg in gas  may help it looks all crudded up.   Ultra somic cleaning would be   nice to.

    Joining AOMCI has priviledges 🙂


    The Boat House


    Replies: 4021
    Topics: 99
    #268477



    They are pretty easy to take apart and clean after
    removing the starter handle and releasing the rope.
    Tubs
    .


    seakaye12

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 863
    Topics: 103
    #268478

    Hi Bill,

    Thanks for the explanation of the Magna Pull.  I have not (yet) had the pleasure of working on one of those.  I know that you have the manual but for the benefit of others who may be reading this thread….I have attached a copy of the Starter Chapter of my Mercury Manual.

    Maybe it will help someone.

    Good Luck!

    Mercury-Starter-Reference

    Attachments:

    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #268512

    Thanks, Tubs, for the pictures. I think my problem is in the peened-over part, though. I will have to take it further apart than what you have there.

    Thanks, Seakaye, for the manual page. Yes, I do have the manual; but I never thought to look at it, as I thought that it was not a serviceable part. And no, I didn’t look at the parts diagram either!! So it seems like I can grind the peen off and get it apart. But what seems vague is how I would peen it over again on assembly, if I ground off material. I guess I would need to have a new center shaft.

    Crosbyman, I have soaked and sprayed it until the cows came home, and then some. It was originally very tight but is much better now. Still, it seems like If I could get it all the way apart, I might be able to get it VERY freed up, which may solve my ultimate problem.

    Long live American manufacturing!


    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1907
    Topics: 29
    #268513

    they will lockup if you don’t have the nut in place. FACT!!!!!!!!!

    to lose is no good

    1 914 310 7086

    Dave.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 4021
    Topics: 99
    #268515



    Got me curious and I had a starter sitting
    on the floor so I did a little checking.
    Yours could be missing this pin.
    If yours wasn’t made with a pin, then what Dave said.
    Tubs
    .


    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #268533

    I do have that key/pin in place. Thanks. I know that there needs to be some friction between the lock-out mechanism and the shaft or pulley. My concern is that the friction between the center shaft and the pulley itself is still a little too much, even with all the spraying, soaking and Christen Science.

    Long live American manufacturing!


    The Boat House


    Replies: 4021
    Topics: 99
    #268542



    Ok I think I understand now. Just the collar is
    slipping. The shaft that its on is binding in
    the rope pulley and that assembly isn’t made to
    be taken apart. Just guessing that collar is loose
    because someone ahead of you was attempting
    to remove the shaft for the same reason. Be
    interested in how you get it solved Bill.
    Tubs
    .


    mercguy

    Lifetime Member
    Replies: 30
    Topics: 6
    #268689

    Hi Bill   When the retainer is found to be loose, simply tap on the end of the sheave shaft to additionally peen the shaft.  This tightens the collar against the retainer to provide the needed friction to keep the retainer in proper position.  Regards Bob Grubb


    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #268694

    Thanks, Bob. I will give that a try. I was about ready to change out the whole sheave assembly with one from what I think was a KE4; but I hate doing that kind of thing. It is essentially surrendering!

    Long live American manufacturing!


    green-thumbs

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 530
    Topics: 41
    #268714

    A few thoughts for what they are worth…

    1)  Claw hammer is for driving and pulling common nails. They are unsafe when used for other purposes. My tool collection has lead, brass. plastic, rubber, raw hide, and ball peen hammers. All are the right tool for their intended purpose, Eye protection always! !

    2) Wear on sheeve Shaft may be bind up recoild

    3) Brake Klean, a spray can product cuts thru thick goo instantly or sooner. I get it at Meijers grocery store automotive department.

    You may be able to source either a better rewind assembly or NOS sheeve shaft. I have not worked on a recoild in a while, No fond memories.

    Louis

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #269011

    I tried peening over the shaft a little at a time. The lock out mechanism did start to move properly but by the time that happened, there was enough overall friction in the starter that the spring would no longer recoil it smoothly. In fact, when I turned the stater upright, to it’s operating position, it would barely recoil at all. I checked how much spring wind I had left when the recoil was fully extended and the answer was ZERO. So, scab picker that I am, I took it apart. I decided to split the collar and save the shaft. There is a lot going on there, that you can’t see until it all comes apart, like the wave washer shown in the picture. You can see some remaining corrosion on the shaft, that I can now clean up. I am thinking that if I get the pulley itself to turn virtually friction-less, then when I peen the new collar, I won’t need so much friction on IT, to make it function.

    Long live American manufacturing!

    Attachments:

    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #269116

    I’m moving at a snail’s pace on this project as I do these days, because I have so much going on that I don’t know whether to s#*t or wind my watch. However, I did manage to locate what appears to be the exact collar in McMaster Carr, and also managed to “un-peen” the end of the shaft, so I can put the new collar on it.

    Long live American manufacturing!

    Attachments:

    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1909
    Topics: 62
    #269254

    I cleaned the sheave shaft up thoroughly, lubed it and put the shaft and sheave assembly back together with the new collar. I must say, whatever the shaft is made of, it is very compliant. I had removed the original peening by just basically hammering it back out straight. When I put the new McMaster collar on it, it peened back over again like it was a new shaft and I had never even touched it; no cracking or anything. I just kept peening, a little at a time, until the lock-out mechanism moved as it should. I’m pleased at how easy it turned out to be, to fix it. The McMaster part number is 92415A841 and seems absolutely identical to the original little collar.

    Long live American manufacturing!

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