Oil mix

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  • james hobson


    Replies: 31
    Topics: 11
    #248043

    Ok guys I know this is an old argument but would like to rehash a bit ,I know many say to mix 16.1 on old 1950s evinrude motors and back then that’s what the manufacturer recommend however oil back then was crap compared to today’s oils,I have talked to 2 outboard engine mechanics that have worked on many old and new motors and said mixing that rich with today’s high quality is just not necessary they went on to they have seem many that use pensoil had a very high build up of carbon They told me it safe to mix 50.1 in my 3 1950s evinrude motors using Quicksilver oil made by mercury that was plenty of protection with a high quality oil , what are your thoughts, thanks


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248045

    ..well I’ll bite…

    I never run leaner on oil then 32/1 in jeweled stuff and 16/1 on non-jeweled motors.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3617
    Topics: 91
    #248046

    I run 3oz. per.gal., about 42 to 1, in most all
    my motors from the 1920’s up to the 1960’s
    including the one in the video below.

    You're only as smart as the person you're talking to.


    james hobson


    Replies: 31
    Topics: 11
    #248049

    Yes but how why


    james hobson


    Replies: 31
    Topics: 11
    #248050

    I would say that’s proof what kind of oil do you use


    johnny


    Replies: 39
    Topics: 16
    #248052

    I use what the manufacturer recommended.


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248053

    Mix for the worst of times…not the best of times..


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3617
    Topics: 91
    #248059


    The oil I’m using is Pennzoil Full synthetic.
    It’s no longer being manufactured and I will
    likely run out of it next summer. I will likely
    go with another full synthetic but I believe
    using a synthetic blend provides the same
    protection. I choose a full synthetic because
    I believe they are more environmentally friendly.
    The Pennzoil claimed to be biodegradable.
    You see it is the worst of times.
    (Will outboards and inboards be next in
    California?)
    Would using a biodegradable oil and reducing
    the amount have lessened the assault on 2
    cycle motors? Probably not. It still maters
    to me what I put into the air and water.
    I try to be as clean as I can and still run my
    motors. I was born in 1946. When I go to the
    dentist I don’t want the recommended
    procedures from 1946.

    You're only as smart as the person you're talking to.


    Mumbles

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 5245
    Topics: 282
    #248073

    An event should be organized at one of the larger meets to see just how little oil can be used in motors running at WOT for an extended period of time. Different classes would be needed for RBM’s, low compression trolling motors, and high compression high horsepower go fast motors. Whoever blows or burns up their classic/antique motor last in each class wins!

    Anyone found using factory recommended oil ratios would be disqualified for cheating.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Mumbles.

    retiredoz

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 513
    Topics: 26
    #248104

    Excellent idea, Mumbles ! It’s always struck me odd that the same folks who are anal about originality insist so strenuously on not following original fuel recommendations.


    Matthew Pieklik

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 58
    Topics: 26
    #248105

    I ran 50:1 in my 1960 10 hp Johnson. Real noisy. Changed it to 32:1 and it ran real smooth.


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248112

    When I say worst of times I mean an overheat, marginal fuel pump or other lean condition one might not notice until too late. Motors with the piston thrust on the exhaust side of the jug are more prone to scoring on a lean condition.


    labrador-guy

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 587
    Topics: 47
    #248114


    The oil I’m using is Pennzoil Full synthetic.
    It’s no longer being manufactured and I will
    likely run out of it next summer. I will likely
    go with another full synthetic but I believe
    using a synthetic blend provides the same
    protection. I choose a full synthetic because
    I believe they are more environmentally friendly.
    The Pennzoil claimed to be biodegradable.
    You see it is the worst of times.
    (Will outboards and inboards be next in
    California?)
    Would using a biodegradable oil and reducing
    the amount have lessened the assault on 2
    cycle motors? Probably not. It still maters
    to me what I put into the air and water.
    I try to be as clean as I can and still run my
    motors. I was born in 1946. When I go to the
    dentist I don’t want the recommended
    procedures from 1946.

    TBH Wallie world list a Pennzoil Synthetic 2cycle oil. Last time I was there they had several gallons. Are you talking about something different? I also run my motors a little lean maybe 24 to one or 32 to one and I do like Pennzoil. The black transom and a big wad of goobers all over the lower unit when running 16 to 1 is down right embarrassing!

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pennzoil-Marine-Premium-Plus-2-Cycle-Synthetic-Blend-Motor-Oil-1-Gallon/148974118?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&&adid=22222222227066773885&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=170876320968&wl4=aud-430887228898:pla-276728538851&wl5=200513&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=148974118&veh=sem&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy4f21anL8wIV52xvBB03PgaTEAQYAiABEgKISfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

    Myzaswell Jusdoit


    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1610
    Topics: 48
    #248116

    When I say worst of times I mean an overheat, marginal fuel pump or other lean condition one might not notice until too late. Motors with the piston thrust on the exhaust side of the jug are more prone to scoring on a lean condition.

    I agree with this logic and do the same thing myself. I am coming up on being a professional boat tech for nearly 50 years. Back when I was doing a lot of two stroke work, rings would get stuck and the pistons would melt down, a lot. OMC, Merc, Force, Yamaha, (yes YAMAHA, too!)….same thing. After the bad compression check, we would always paw around the boat and there it would be: Conventional Penzoil, West Marine, or some other crap oil. Quicksilver Premium Plus seemed to be the best.

    I tell the story every time this subject comes up; but when I was a kid, a supposed good marine mechanic told me 50:1 was okay for my 1956 7.5 Evinrude with plain bearings. It went about 1000 feet and threw a rod. For the little time we actually put on our engines, why in the world would you want to take a chance? We are the guys that are supposed to SAVE these things, not blow them up!

    Long live American manufacturing!


    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4075
    Topics: 41
    #248117

    OK, well there are many variables to this discussion for sure. No doubt, today’s OEM two stroke oils are much better than what was around back in the 50s. James, choosing an oil mix relies heavily on the older outboards you are running. Like Bill says, regardless of oil improvements, 50s OMCs with plain rod bearings require 16:1. Keep in mind that not all 50s OMCs required 16:1, even back in the 50s.
    Like others have said, I always mix for the heaviest oil mix for my several OMC engines. In other words, my two line OMC tanks always get mixed at 16:1, my single line OMC fuel tanks get mixed at 24:1. Keep in mind that none of my old two line engines have been converted to a single line/fuel pump system. My mixing routine would not work for owners who have converted older two line engines to single line fuel pump engines.
    I can’t speak for other manufacturers, except to say it is wise to follow their original mixing recommendations for a particular engine. Is this “overkill”? Perhaps, it really depends on how many old engines you run, and how many hours you put on them.
    This will always be a “hot button” topic. Keep in mind that most of today’s techs have little or no experience with older engines, and have no business commenting about them. Even some of the OEM/OMC recommendations from later years are absolutely wrong for some of the older engines.

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