Oil mix

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  • The Boat House


    Replies: 3617
    Topics: 91
    #248121

    The Pennzoil I have been using is a full synthetic. It is made from
    natural gas and I suspect what is in their blend that that you’re
    familiar with. I have 2 gallons left. That’s enough for a bit over 80
    gallons. That is what is left of the 12 gallons I bought when it was
    discontinued but I had been using it for years before that.
    Dealers were providing service for engine failures when the heaver
    oil mixes were common. The “manufactures” began recommending
    50 to 1 when 2 cycle oil first became available over 50 years ago.
    I have been using synthetic oils since 1975 in some motors as lean
    as 100 to 1 and I have never had a failure. Actually in one case it
    extended the time before rebuild. I believe the person who started
    this thread is looking to run less oil. I am providing my 48 years of
    experience of doing that. He said after watching my video he
    thought that was proof. It’s not. I’m just another guy on the internet.
    He or anyone can consider it or reject it. The proof will be his own
    experience if he decides to do so. When considering how much oil
    is necessary you should use your best judgement.

    You're only as smart as the person you're talking to.


    james hobson


    Replies: 31
    Topics: 11
    #248126

    When you were a kid I am sure the oil was crap, I would guess the synthetic oil today has 10x the viscosity and is much better oil I am not convinced that would happen with synthetic oil.


    james hobson


    Replies: 31
    Topics: 11
    #248127

    I agree the proof is in the pudding, thanks for insight.


    kerry

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 418
    Topics: 18
    #248128

    Ratios are not about the quality of the oil but the quantity. Keep in mind the quality of machinery back when your particular motor was built. In the 1930’s, tolerences were pretty loose because the machinery was primitive by today’s standards. Lots of oil helped fill in the clearances. Things got a bit better machinery wise post WW2, and ratios thinned as tolerences got tighter when more accurate machinery was created.. Nowadays, CNC machinery is the norm, tolerences are measured in ten thousandths not thousandths, and thinner oils in smaller doses are used. You can take your chances with less oil if you choose, its your motor. Personally, I’m with Tubs, using full synthetic until my last half gallon of Pennz runs out, then will search for a replacement. I mix at mfrs ratio and add a splash of Seafoam to keep things cleaner inside. As the elders say, oil is cheaper than parts. I agree.

    If you have too many, AND not enough, you're a collector.


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248129

    As far as pass-through applications go oil of yesteryear was not that bad. Modern oils are better…long term shearing and such yes but in pass-through applications not so much.

    …from bob is the oil guy.. in fact modern oils for 2smokes have been neutered to some extent for pollution reasons.


    The Boat House


    Replies: 3617
    Topics: 91
    #248137

    The section of a bearing that is under pressure
    as a motor runs has the thinnest film of oil.
    There is only room for so much oil there no
    matter how much you mix in to fuel. Once you
    have enough to prevent contact, there is no
    benefit to adding more. Then there is friction.
    The slicker the oil the less wear. You see it’s
    the friction of the oil as the components rotate
    that wears away the metal. Just as water does
    running over a stone. It’s the same for the rings.
    For me it’s the quality that will reduce wear
    resulting in longer engine life. Others obviously
    see it differently.

    You're only as smart as the person you're talking to.


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248138

    …feed that journal with premix…50/1 verses 16/1 on a plain bearing….not my motor…roller elements 50/1 is fine. With a high silicon piston skirt 50/1 is okay when things are perfect. Early pistons were soft and need 16/1.

    I understand the gas flashes off leaving the oil film. 50/1 is not enough oil for a non-pressure fed plain bearing. 50/1 was a boardroom decision for sales. The newer crowd sees an oil cloud they assume the motor is worn out like a 4 stroke.

    The very first week of getting my 4 year in mechanical the prof says any product that lasts too long is a product failure…and products are designed to make investors money but that’s another issue..

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.

    JOHN HOLBIK


    Replies: 148
    Topics: 2
    #248144

    When OMC switiched to 50 to 1 all the motors had fixed high speed jet which prevented operators from running them too lean.


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248162

    …and keeps operators from running slightly rich for safety. Every fixed jetted carb motor I have received I go one hotter plug and jet to that. The folx on the chainsaw forums understand this. Manufactures have no incentive to make their products live much past warranty period. By running short on oil and slightly lean this is accomplished.

    The only 4 stroke outboard I have owned from new was jetted too lean for optimum operation also. Most carbed 4 strokes of today are jetted slightly lean …especially the low speed jet.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by rudderless.

    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4075
    Topics: 41
    #248255

    I stand by my opinion expressed before, this OMC recommendation is dangerous when it comes to CD/AD series engines with plain bearings. 16:1 is what should still be used. The beauty part of these engines is that they smoke very little, even at 16:1 when in good shape and properly tuned…


    Mumbles

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 5245
    Topics: 282
    #248267

    Here’s a ’58 Johnson CD which I just finished servicing. It’s running on a 16:1 mix using Canadian Tire dino oil and shows no smoke at idle and just a bit when revved up some.. This wouldn’t even be noticeable if it was on a boat out on a lake.


    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4075
    Topics: 41
    #248281

    Here’s a ’58 Johnson CD which I just finished servicing. It’s running on a 16:1 mix using Canadian Tire dino oil and shows no smoke at idle and just a bit when revved up some.. This wouldn’t even be noticeable if it was on a boat out on a lake.

    What a beautiful engine, thanks for the testament to the old engines….


    rudderless


    Replies: 152
    Topics: 5
    #248297

    Anyone remember the 100/1 recommended mix some years ago? how’d that go…


    Monte NZ

    International Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 173
    Topics: 52
    #248336

    I remember seeing a can back about 1963……..can’t remember the brand. It was in a small sealed can, similar to a baked bean can, but smaller. I think it came from Singapore and if I remember correctly, it had a warning on it that it wasn’t good for your health and to be careful using it.

    It was a bit of an eye opener to us young guys who were used to using 24 to one oil ratios

    Monte NZ


    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4075
    Topics: 41
    #248339

    Anyone remember the 100/1 recommended mix some years ago? how’d that go…

    Great point indeed…. This is what happens when the marketing department has way too much control….

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