Re-built Evinrude 18 HP 1960 won’t start

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  • crosbyman

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2991
    Topics: 287
    #269517

    Start or just a bit higher should do … on the throttle

    plug wires… FRONT coil goes to the top plug …   confirm !

    if you spin the FW with a drill can you  you feel  the air sucked in the carb face …?

    did you clean out  & blow the  idle circuit passages :       side passage to the top,…   place gasket #47  in line with  side channel …. clean out the idle drip holes under plug  #27

    needle 35  “openned out” enough per  book   to let fuel   reach the top drip chamber  under plug 27  and be sucked inside the engine

    to confirm fuel  properly fills the carb… remove  needle#60   pump the bulb and fuel should spill out… in a rag placed under the carb   pump the bulb  for more  fuel  .  replace and adjust needle

     

     

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    Biddaddydan

    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 15
    Topics: 2
    #269521

    I’ve been there and done that (read: basic errors) while tinkering with my outboards. I thought I might share them with you:

    Ignition:

    a) Make sure that the lead feeding the top cylinder come out of the coil sitting forward on the armature plate.

    b) Test your spark with the plugs installed using a gap spark tester. Testing spark by holding the plug  near the block or with a neon testers cannot let you properly evaluate the strength of the spark. The fact that you changed the points and condensers does not guarantee sufficient spark given the  low quality of replacement parts these days (even on OEM).

    Fuel:

    a) First, make sure you use fresh fuel and very importantly that your tank fuel line has been purged of that old fuel trapped in there since last year.

    b) Before your cranking joust,squeeze the fuel priming bulb continuously while carefully inspecting all lines , components and connections from the tank all the way to the carb, making sure all is tight.

    c) After priming the fuel system, crank the motor (give yourself a break and use an 1/2 inch electric drill connected to the flywheel nut). If it doesn’t start, remove and inspect the plugs. The electrode area should be wet / smell of gas. If not, check the engine fuel connector for a possible blockage or a blockage/kink  in the fuel lines all the way to the carb. You may also disconnect the fuel pump outgoing line and see if it spits out while squeezing the primer pump and  while the motor is being cranked, if not, rebuild the fuel pump.

    d) If that doesn’t resolve the problem, rebuild the carb (yes, another time) and once it’s off remove the intake and reed valve/plate assembly and make sure the reeds close tight against the plate (hold it up to a light source, none should shine through). Leaking reed valves go undetected by the compression check but will prevent a 2-stroke to fire up.

    Keep up the spirits !

    There are no old outboards, just machines so well built, they have outlasted their owners !


    Mumbles

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 5624
    Topics: 294
    #269523

    Just a stray thought, but are you pulling the motor over hard enough?  With the eighteens, I find you have to pull on the rope like you mean it to get them started.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Mumbles.

    salnaes

    International Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 38
    Topics: 8
    #269526

    Hi everyone! Success!

    The 18 horse started and is working nicely. I did spray a little fuel mix in the intake on the carb and the engine started. I had to adjust high and low speed to get it running nice and steady.

    I’ve run it for an hour on a little under half throttle and in forward gear. Water is coming out of the opening in the exhaust tube as expected. It runs nice.

    After shutting down the engine and draining the water from tank, I discovered some oil in the water. There were also oil outside on the exhaust tube under the exhaust port and also oil on the outside of the gear case and skeg.  I discovered to small holes on the gear case and there were oil in the openings of these holes. I got a bad feeling that those two holes should not be there. Could anyone comment on the holes?

    20221130_154150
    20221130_154125

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    salnaes

    International Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 38
    Topics: 8
    #269530

    Sorry. I forgot to reply Crosbyman. fairly good compression.. sorry, I should have said very good compression. In the end it turned out that everything worked as expected.
    Thanks for taking time to write posts on this. I love this place.


    labrador-guy

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 817
    Topics: 59
    #269533

    Sal, you have had quite an adventure!  The answer to your question is just put the pointer on the twist grip to start.  Pull out the choke and make sure it is closed tight.  Fuel pumped up and in a couple pulls you should see some gas around the choke butterfly.  The throttle opens about a quart way when the choke is pulled.

    hope you get some smoke soon

    dale


    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 6452
    Topics: 959
    #269557

    Congratulations! Motor sounds great.
    I’m guessing that hole is just a housing drain
    to prevent water freezing and busting the housing,
    but someone will know for sure.

    Prepare to be boarded!


    mark weaver


    Replies: 54
    Topics: 11
    #269558

    Are you sure you haven’t got the plug wires crossed? The top plug wire has a tin tag that says top or up.


    crosbyman

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2991
    Topics: 287
    #269559

    the tin tag may have been lost..   motor work now   great job Sal happy motoring now find another one to fix and collect 😉

    hole is a drain  for oily residues and… water   alway storethe engine vertically !!!   run a pipe cleaner   once or  twice per season to keep open especially before storage if  stored in freezing temps

    oil in the  test tank comes from unburnt fuel/oil which all 2 strokes  spit out  with the exhaust

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    Mumbles

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 5624
    Topics: 294
    #269561

    With the shift lever in neutral, twisting the throttle grip until it stops will automatically set the ignition timing for starting.  Pulling the choke  all the way out will automatically set the throttle opening for starting. All that’s left to do is pull hard on the rope and away you go!

    NOTE: This procedure will not work if the shift lever is in forward or reverse gear. It’s gotta be in neutral.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by Mumbles.
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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1961
    Topics: 63
    #269566

    I’m glad it’s running now. They sound great, don’t they? I LOVE those engines! The holes you show are water drain holes, to prevent freeze damage, a particularly handy feature in NORWAY! This is a 1960 two-stroke engine, so not a whole lot of concern was given to the fact that some of the fuel mix doesn’t burn and goes out through the exhaust, resulting in some oil in the water. If it makes you feel any better, the worst of this usually happens at start up, because of the choke use, and also, prior to getting the mixture adjustments dialed in correctly….which you will do even more accurately, once it’s on a boat. Don’t worry: On an actual boat, you may see a very small amount of oil in the water, but nothing even close to like your test tank.

    Long live American manufacturing!


    lindy46

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 468
    Topics: 40
    #269580

    Yup,  drain holes, supposed to be there. Water and exhaust residue should be seeping out.


    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 4397
    Topics: 45
    #269582

    I’m sure the newer style pistons/rings will work just fine, just pointing out that you have to be careful.  I haven’t researched this, so maybe OMC really did supercede the older style pistons to the newer style.  But, the superceded part number would probably have been for a “kit”, that would have included the newer style rings.  If not, the OMC price book would have spelled out that you needed the newer style rings as well.

    OK, there is spark on both cylinders, so I am sure that the coil primary leads are connected to the correct set of points.  But, just because there is strong spark does not guarantee the timing is correct.  Generally speaking, the coil that faces forward is connected to the #1/top cylinder.  It is very easy to get things mixed up while rewiring plug leads and coils, I have done it many times.  I never trust myself, so leave the plug leads “long/untrimmed”, until I have gotten the engine running and am sure I have gotten it right.  I’m not saying you have it mixed up, just saying it is an easy mistake to make.

    So, I would start by priming the cylinders with fuel/oil mix to see if that gets the engine running.  If not, then I would simply swap plug leads and try again.  There is a “stop” on the mag plate that limits the max throttle setting in neutral, I would just advance the throttle to that position while trying to start it.  And yes, that cheesy plastic choke detent is a poor design and the choke knob on that model is not very easy to use properly either.


    salnaes

    International Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 38
    Topics: 8
    #269584

    Thank you all for clearing out the purpose of the two holes. I’m relieved. Well, since the 18 horse is running nice and steady, I recon there’s no problems with ignition, carb, reeds or anything. Soon I will try it on my boat. Thanks to everybody using time and effort to help me. After all it turned out that all I had to do to get it started was spraying fuel mixture in the intake on the carb. Now it runs nice and steady. Thanks again. Sal.


    Mumbles

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 5624
    Topics: 294
    #269585

    Only the hole on the starboard side near the prop is a drain hole.  The other one on the other side is a blind hole and goes nowhere. It was probably used in the manufacturing process to set the housing up in a fixture for machining.

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